The Expressive Line . . .

.  .  .  Figure drawings by Patricia Halbeck

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April 3, 2014

The Framemaker proudly presents charcoal drawings of the human form by Austin Peay State University (APSU) professor of Music, Patricia Halbeck. This exhibit is part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on April 3, 2014. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The drawings will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of March during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

Patricia Halbeck works with equal passion in both figure and landscape genres. Preferring to paint and draw from life, she is a regular member of the Open Studio sessions at Warehouse 521 in Nashville. Her landscapes are often done “Plein air” with the Chestnut Group around the middle Tennessee region. As a pianist and professor of music at Austin Peay State University she is increasingly interested in the interdisciplinary possibilities of the arts.

The artist states, “The illusion of form and volume on a two-dimensional surface is often created using variations in value to indicate the play of light and shadow on an object. However, it is also true that form can be beautifully articulated by accurate and expressive outlines with little to no modeling of interior structures. This series of drawings was done to explore this concept. Subtle curves of the human form are remarkably clear indicators of interior anatomical structure. The hidden muscles and bones are clothed with the veil of skin that ebbs and flows over them in an endless series of convex arcs. In addition, the variations of an expressive line are endless; dark, light, thick, thin, exploring lost and found edges.”

Halbeck continues, “A charcoal outline can become almost melodic in its ability to suggest, clarify and communicate what is within the boundaries of the form.  I am fascinated by the oft-quoted idea that ‘less is more.’  These works are an attempt to portray the beauty of God’s highest creation with an economical but expressive use of the line.”

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Recent works by Susan Tomi McGolrick

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March 6

The Framemaker proudly presents an exhibit by artist Susan Tomi McGolrick. This exhibit is part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on March 6, 2014. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of March during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

STATEMENT My children grew up hearing my childhood stories. I was the storyteller. I used my memories to teach them lessons and make them laugh. Somestories were harder to tell. Others were incredibly funny. Many were wound around my mother and the cultural clashes that often exist in first generation Japanese daughters. What she expected from me and what I expected from her was often lost in translation. In trying to learn Japanese to better communicate with my mother, I found that there are words that have no English equivalents. And now my relationships with my children and my mother have settled into accepting intentions rather than words which offer up room for forgiveness.

BIO I earned a BFA in Studio Arts concentrating on alternative processes in film photography from Austin Peay State University (APSU) in 2010. As a Founding Member of the APSU Friends of the Goldsmith Press & Rare Type collection, I continue to bring the press to the public for hands-on demonstrations. I am on the Visual Arts staff for the Community School of the Arts with APSU teaching classes for children and teens and conducting workshops for adults. I also participate in Austin Peay’s Artists in Schools Program. During the summers of 2012 and 2013 I was the lead Art Counselor at Camp Sycamore for the Girl Scouts. My teaching focuses mainly on, but is not limited to, printmaking and bookmaking.

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Mementos: Photography by Alison Hamilton

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February 6

The Framemaker proudly presents an “instant photograph” exhibit by Alison Hamilton. This exhibit is part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on February 6, 2014. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of February during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).According to Hamilton, “Instant photographs are often wrought with nostalgic elements. With the demise of Polaroid technology, we are particularly drawn to the Polaroid image’s sentimental role in photographic history. The balance of instant photography’s capability of eliciting loveliness and its irreverent, gratuitous nature suits my endeavors perfectly. As much as this form of photography is related to general ideas of the past, for me it keeps me aligned to the present.”Hamilton continues, “Staying in the present is one of the hardest challenges for me. These instant photos allow me to capture inimitable moments that make tangible memories, but the real magic is in their creation and how it pertains to my life. Within moments I have an image; within moments I create a visual and written landscape of how I feel, think, see, and experience this life right now. I can force myself to live and be awake when I am gathering time vicariously through a plastic lens. I can give myself meaning by assigning it to the details of my daily encounters. I can be expressive through these photos by giving myself the catalyst to start conversation. I can create tokens of remembrance to keep myself seeing and pushing buttons.”

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“Binding Desire: Unfolding Artist Books” at Otis College of Art and Design Features the Work of Professor Cindy Marsh

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Professor Jesse Shaw and APSU Alumnus Greg Sand Are Featured in “Under the Radar” at the Cumberland Gallery until February 15.

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Cumberland Gallery is pleased to present Under the Radar, a group show featuring emerging artists Andrew Holmquist, Eric Oglander, Greg Sand, Jesse Shaw, Patrick Brien, and Max Shuster. The opening reception will be held Saturday, January 11th, from 6:00PM – 8:00PM. The event is free and open to the public.

Greg Sand’s beautifully manipulated photographs are set against vintage carte de visites, stereographs, and tintypes. These lonely shadows, empty shoes, and vast landscapes refer to the passage of time, memory, and mortality. Sand has consistently worked with concepts of temporality of life and the experience of loss in subtle and sensitive ways. You may recognize his work from past Cumberland shows but expect to see a prolific display of current works.

Jesse Shaw is a printmaker from Tennessee primarily working in relief prints carved from linoleum blocks. He received his MFA in Printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design and currently teaches Printmaking and Foundations at Austin Peay State University. Shaw’s prints focus on the visual narrative of American culture using texture, animals, and inanimate objects as stand ins for ideas, events, and actions dealing with issues of morality and ethics. A combination of George Orwell’s Animal Farm and Japenese Ukiyo-e prints of ghost stories, Shaw’s work taps into that part of our psyche which recognizes the duality of beauty and ugliness in modern life.

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Traditional Portrait Studies by the students of Brad Reagan at Austin Peay State University

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January 2, 2013

The Framemaker proudly presents portraits by Austin Peay State University (APSU) drawing students, taught by Brad Reagan. This exhibit is part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on January 2, 2013. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The drawings will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of January during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.). These are the final projects of Brad Reagan’s figure drawing class. Students were drilled all semester with observational and material skills used in basic drawing. These skills were applied to the human body while focusing on the portrait. The class emphasized proportions and relationships between body parts such as the eyes and nose. Students were shown how to look at abstract shapes of the cheek (such as the shape between the eyes and the nostril) in order to maintain correct proportions. Attention to abstract shapes that compose the face creates an accurate representation. There is a long tradition of portraiture in art history. Students focused on Old Masters such as Rembrandt, as well as Modern Masters like Lucian Freud. According to Brad Reagan, “The most important part of drawing instruction, aside from line and material sensitivity, is teaching students how to ‘look.’” With hard work and focus, the students were able to meet or surpass the instructor’s expectations.

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Four Hand Compositions: Collaborative artwork by Billy Renkl and Greg Sand

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December 5

The Framemaker proudly presents work by artists Billy Renkl and Greg Sand as part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on December 5, 2013. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit, entitled “Four Hand Compositions,” will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of December during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

Originally from Birmingham, Ala., artist and educator Billy Renkl currently teaches drawing at Austin Peay State University (APSU). He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Visual Communications from Auburn University and a Master of Fine Arts degree in Drawing from the University of South Carolina. His work has been featured in many solo and group exhibitions, including solo shows at The Cumberland Gallery (Nashville, Tenn.), Marguerite Oestreicher Fine Arts (New Orleans, La.), Vanderbilt University, The University of Kentucky, The Tennessee Arts Commission, and the Galerie Neue Raume (Berlin, Germany). He is represented in several permanent collections, including The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Kiwanis Club International, The Tennessee State Museum, and The College of Notre Dame, Baltimore. In addition to gallery exhibitions, Renkl has worked with many clients on illustration assignments, including Southwest Airlines, How Magazine, Vanderbilt University, Klutz Inc., Strategy & Business, The River Styx, Poems and Plays, and Rigby Publishing.

Greg Sand currently produces artwork in Clarksville, Tenn. He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography from APSU in 2008. Sand explores the issues of existence, time, and death through the medium of digital photography. Sand’s images address the nature of photography and its role in defining reality. He has won the acclaim of both jurors and audiences. In 2009, Sand was selected by critic Catherine Edelman and the Griffin Museum of Photography as one of “the most exciting new artists emerging in the world of photography.”

In the exhibit “Four Hand Compositions” Renkl and Sand have collaborated together to create a new body of work that refutes the paradigm of the artist working in isolation. The title refers to ‘four hand piano’ — a duet intended to be played by two musicians on the same piano. Although both artists primarily use found imagery, they work with it in uniquely different ways. An example of this is: one artist emphasizes accrual while the other artist often employs subtraction.

The artists state, “Over the past seven years, we’ve each used the other as a ‘sounding board’ when discussing our individual bodies of work.” They continue, “Recasting our studio practice has been surprisingly easy because the act of collaboration favors regard over self-regard, conversation over solitude and empathy over self-expression. It is a relief to have a voice outside oneself to ratify what is effective and clarify what is not.”

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Elements: Photography by Kim Balevre

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November 7

The Framemaker proudly presents photography by graphic designer Kim Balevre as part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on November 7, 2013. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit, entitled “Elements,” will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of November during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

Kim Balevre completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Visual Communications in 2008 at Austin Peay State University where she now works as a graphic designer in the Public Relations and Marketing department. She has exhibited in several solo and group art shows in the Clarksville area as well as in Louisvillle, Ky.

Kim states, “During the course of my profession as a graphic designer, I have developed a fine sense of interpreting design elements such as composition, negative space and color. Photography allows me a way to create an engaging visual environment through these elements. It is also a way to experiment with spontaneity and chance. In the past year, I traveled to various places and this is a visual collection of my journey.”

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October 3

The Framemaker proudly presents photography by husband and wife team, Shane Moore and Jane Moore as part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on October 3, 2013. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit, entitled “Images in E Minor” will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of October during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.)

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Professor Laura Golobish presents “Breathe and Decay” at the Framemaker

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September 5

The Framemaker proudly presents work by art historian and photographer Laura Golobish as part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on September 5, 2013. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit, entitled ”Breathe and Decay,” will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of September during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).

Laura Golobish earned an Master of Arts in art history at the University of Georgia in 2010, and is currently an instructor in the art department at Austin Peay State University. Her most recent art and research has considered the body in the context of a variety of philosophical and religious structures.

In the series “Breathe and Decay” Golobish uses the language of yoga to address issues of balance and adaptability. She states, “I began practicing yoga two years ago with hopes of improving my flexibility and balance. Those elements have improved…slowly. Before I noticed any of those benefits, the practice offered an interesting perspective. Yoga frustrated and upset me as a new practitioner. I felt inadequate in comparison to students capable of expressing more advanced poses while I struggled to touch my toes.”

Golobish continues, “In yoga, we’re challenged to pull deep into the moment and fully surrender to the essence of our being. To complement the images of asanas (yoga poses), I developed a series of photograms. These are cameraless photographs that require placing an object on a piece of light-sensitive material and exposing it to light. I asked each of my subjects to lend me an object that described them or was important to them. These became the subjects of my photograms. The process can be used to produce a basic outline, but these images bear little resemblance to the original object. They’ve become abstracted just as our essence or outline becomes distorted by layers of distraction. As an act of process, I have to breathe, accept myself as I exist in the present and allow everything else to decay into the universe.”

 

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